Educational Articles – Home Abounds Charity

You can be your best health advocate to help prevent or detect cancer early.
Knowledge is power and prevention is key.

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Daily Exercise: Just What the Doctor Ordered When Dealing with Cancer

hope abounds, cancer supportHEALTHY LIVING – APRIL 14, 2015
Daily Exercise: Just What the Doctor Ordered When Dealing with Cancer
Susan Yaguda, RN, MSN Coordinator Integrative Oncology Levine Cancer Institute Charlotte, NC
In the past, people undergoing cancer treatment were told not to exercise, but to rest as much as possible. Although getting good rest is for important, we now know that regular exercise is very important for patients undergoing cancer treatment and those who have completed treatment.

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How to Prepare for Hair Loss from Cancer Therapy

HOPE ABOUNDS, hair loss, cancer sujpport

PATIENT STORIES, SURVIVORSHIP, WEB EXCLUSIVE – MAY 13, 2015
How to Prepare for Hair Loss from Cancer Therapy
Tracy Wright
We color it, cut it, braid it, shave it, perm it, curl it, straighten it, lengthen it, and comb it over. It’s one of the first things others see when they meet us, and it’s a visual cue to our personality.

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BRCA Testing and Prophylactic Mastectomy for Breast Cancer Prevention
In this CURE Connections program, Dr. Philippa Cheetham interviews Judy Nymberg, a woman whose mother died of breast cancer at an early age. Judy shares her story about her mother’s disease, her own experience with genetic testing, and the decisions she made, undergoing prophylactic surgery to reduce her risk of developing cancer. Dr. Cheetham also talks to a certified genetic counselor, Jacquelyn Powers, from the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, who explains what you need to know about your own lifetime risk, BRCA testing, and how the results of genetic testing may affect you.

Episode 1: Family History of Breast Cancer.
cancer support, charity, hope aboundsIn this segment, Judy Nymberg describes the details of her mother’s breast cancer and her process of her beginning the testing for the BRCA mutation. Most importantly, she emphasizes that before embarking on genetic testing, one has to be prepared for a positive result.

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Episode 2: Who Needs Genetic Testing?
hope abounds, cancer, cancer treatmentGenetic Counselor, Jacquelyn Powers, describes the risk factors for familial breast cancer and who should get tested for a BRCA mutation. For patients who don’t have access to a genetic counselor, virtual “tele-genetics” is now available.

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Episode 3: Preparing for Your BRCA Testing.
hope abounds, cancer support, cancer educationLife insurance, health insurance coverage, and financial assistance are discussed. Many women are concerned about the risk for their daughters. Dr. Cheetham and Jacquelyn Powers talk about how to handle education and testing for them.

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Episode 4: The Genetic Counseling Visit.
hope abounds, chairty, cancer, eductationJacquelyn Powers explains how genetic counseling is tailored to each patient’s individual needs. She reviews the information you will be asked for. Patient, Judy Nymberg discusses her personal experience and what she refers to as “genetics for dummies

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Episode 5: Your BRCA Gene Test Results.
cnacer supports, breast cancer support, cancer chairtyOf course, it’s important to understand your options when your BRCA mutation test is positive. However, there is still a risk of developing breast cancer, albeit lower, if your result is negative or if you have a variant of uncertain significance, Jacquelyn Powers explains all of the possible BRCA test results.
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Episode 6: Options for Women with a BRCA Mutation.
cancer support, caner education, support groupsJudy Nymberg discusses the options that were presented to her once her BRCA2 test came back positive. She describes her decision-making regarding prophylactic surgeries, both oophorectomy and mastectomy.

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Episode 7: BRCA Testing for Men.
cancer education, cancer supportJudy Nymberg talks about her brother who is also positive for a BRCA2 mutation. Jacquelyn Powers explains why BRCA testing is important for men. She also talks about the Genetics Information Nondiscrimination Act which prevents denial of health insurance coverage based on genetic testing results.
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Episode 8: Myths About Risk of Familial Breast Cancer.
cancer support, cancer education, hope aboundsThe group discusses some of the myths pertaining to BRCA gene testing and familial breast cancer. Most patients are satisfied with the experience of going through genetic testing and counseling, even though they may be disappointed at the results. Genetic counseling is tailored to the age of the patient, and testing is not recommended before age 25.
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Fear of Recurrence

hope abounds, cancer

SURVIVORSHIP – JUNE 17, 2015
Fear of Recurrence
Ginger Modiri, San Juan Capistrano, CA
Anyone who has been given a cancer diagnosis knows how important patient care and follow-up visits are for keeping track of progress and staying ahead of any surprises, such as the cancer coming back. Cancer surgery is unlike having your appendix or gallbladder taken out; once those defective organs have been removed, they’re not going to grow back or recur.

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Wider Racial Gap Found in Cervical Cancer Deaths

breast cancer, cancer support

By JAN HOFFMAN,
JAN 23, 2017
The death rate from cervical cancer in the United States is considerably higher than previously estimated and the disparity in death rates between black women and white women is significantly wider, according to a study published Monday in the journal Cancer.
The rate at which black American women are dying from the disease is comparable to that of women in many poor developing nations, researchers reported. What makes the findings especially disturbing, said experts not involved in the research, is that when screening guidelines and follow-up monitoring are pursued, cervical cancer is largely preventable.

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How One Young Man’s Brain Tumor Launched
a Movement: Matthew Zachary’s Journey

cancer educationCaroline Helwick
AUGUST 18, 2015
Matthew Zachary was anticipating a career as a concert pianist and composer, hoping to emulate great composers. A diagnosis of brain cancer altered those plans, but launched a different dream so big that it inspired an entire youth movement.
Matthew’s talent for music was evident from the age of 10. At 19, he composed a piano symphony as part of his graduate school application. He was going to be mentored by Jerry Goldsmith, his idol, at the University of Southern California, when his life took a frightening turn.

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It’s Our Cancer – MULTIPLE MYELOMA

hope abounds, cancer supportBrenda and Steve
Detriot, MI
JUNE 17, 2015
As mother and son, we have shared a life that includes the common bond of cancer. For the past 6 years, multiple myeloma has been a common thread that has strengthened our relationship and has become a focal point of our family.
We have learned a great deal about this unpredictable illness, while also gaining a greater understanding of how to live with cancer, not alone but as a family. Cancer affects not just the patient, but also the family and friends who make up the caregiving team. It is something we go through together.

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How to Eat While You Treat
hope abounds charity, canceer, treatment

Ashley Harris, MS, RD, CSO, Outpatient Clinical Dietitian, James Cancer Hospital/The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH
JUNE 17, 2015
Eating can be a struggle during cancer treatment. Staying well-nourished and maintaining a healthy body weight can help you with everything from fighting fatigue to recovering faster. Unfortunately, many common treatment side effects make it difficult to get enough nutrients. And because your body is under extra stress, it is even more important to get enough nutrients to support your health.

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Dealing with Neuropathy Associated with Chemotherapy

dealing with neuropathy, chemotherapy, hope aboundsJune 17, 2015
Brian D. McMichael, MD, Assistant Professor-Clinical, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
I finished chemotherapy 3 months ago and am struggling with numbness and tingling in my feet. I’ve been tripping more than usual, and fell down on my driveway last week during a rainstorm. Fortunately, I only bruised my hip, but I’m worried that I may break a bone next time. My doctor says I have neuropathy from the chemotherapy. Will it get better? Is there anything I can do to improve my balance?

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The History of Hope for Two…The Pregnant with Cancer Network

pregnant with cancer, survivorship, hope aboundsApril 14, 2015
Lorene Barulich, RN, MSN, OCN | Cancer Care Coordinator, Buffalo Medical Group

On December 1, 1995, halfway through the pregnancy with her third child, Patty Murray, a founder and the current Board Chairwoman, was diagnosed with advanced stage breast cancer. Her excitement and anticipation were crushed. She was suddenly filled with fear and confusion, unsure of the options available to her—whether she could continue with the pregnancy or if she would be forced to terminate the pregnancy. She found that when she sought her doctors’ advice, they had very little experience to offer. She went to the American Cancer Society, but like the doctors, they could provide no guidance for Patty’s particular situation.

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Changing My Dreams: Leukemia is Gone and I Am Left With This?

hope aboundsAUGUST 18, 2015
Amy Velasquez, RN, BSN, Palliative Care Nurse Navigator, University of Kansas Cancer Center, The Richard and Annette Bloch Cancer Care Pavilion, Kansas City, Kansas.
Working with young mothers who are going through cancer treatment while trying to raise their family will make the toughest of souls humble. When I am working with young mothers who have cancer, I always wonder, “What would I do in this situation? How would I handle this?”

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Taking Care of the Caregiver

JUNE 16, 2015
Catherine M. Poole, President/Founder, Melanoma International Foundation, Glenmoore, PA.
Calls and e-mails coming into the Melanoma International Foundation navigation services from patients needing guidance and support are often initiated by a caregiver. The caregiver role has become increasingly important for comprehensive cancer care! Caregivers tend to keep a level head during this often emotionally charged time and, therefore, can keep better track of medications and side effects, as well as the general status of the patient.

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10 Ways to Get Engaged in Your Care

hope aboundsAUGUST 18, 2015
Mandi Pratt-Chapman, MA, Director, George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC.

This column is intended to help you take control and stay engaged in your cancer care. By participating in decisions about your care, you will be able to get the greatest benefit from the health services you need.

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5 Tips for Cancer Survivors to Manage Stress

cancer support, stress managementJUNE 17, 2015
Susan Yaguda, RN, MSN, Coordinator, Integrative Oncology, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, NC.
Do you remember the exact moment you found out you had cancer? Did your mouth go dry, your heart start beating faster? Did you start feeling heaviness in your chest? These are all the symptoms of a stress reaction and, of course, who wouldn’t feel stressed when receiving a cancer diagnosis?

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Genetic Testing for Cancer

hope abounds cancer supportJUNE 17, 2015
Robert Pilarski, MS, LGC, Licensed Genetic Counselor, Associate Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine. The Ohio State University.
Many people are surprised to learn that only about 5% to 10% of cancers are hereditary. Many people possibly assume that cancer is often hereditary, in part because of the press attention given to a number of celebrities who were found to be genetically at risk (for example, Angelina Jolie). Therefore, the information provided by genetic counselors is often more reassuring than expected.

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Should I Get Tested?

gentetic testingAUGUST 18, 2015
The Benefits and Risks of Genetic Testing, Rose McKay.
In 2013, actress Angelina Jolie announced her decision to undergo a bilateral mastectomy after learning that she carried the BRCA1 gene mutation (alteration), which is strongly associated with increased risk for breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Her decision sparked the public’s interest in the role of genetic testing and preventive surgeries, especially for people who have family histories of certain cancer types.

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Melanoma: Not Just Skin Cancer

hope aboundsJUNE 17, 2015
Catherine M. Poole, President/Founder, Melanoma International Foundation, Glenmoore, PA.
Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States, with 3.5 million patients diagnosed each year. According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 76,100 patients will be diagnosed with melanoma this year, with about 1,000 more men than women. Close to 10,000 deaths were caused by melanoma in 2014, with twice as many deaths in men than in women. Men tend to have a higher mortality rate, because late detection in men means the melanoma is found at a later growth stage.

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Leah’s Story: How One Girl with Melanoma Created a Platform. 

hope aboundsAUGUST 18, 2015
By Jenny Valles.
Leah Valles, age 12, is an inspiration every day. After her hard battle with stage III melanoma, she decided that people just don’t know that skin cancer is deadly, that it can be prevented, and that it is the fastest growing cancer among teens and young adults.

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A Scientist’s Dream Fulfilled
Harnessing The Immune System To Fight Cancer.

Jim Allison in his lab at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Scott Dalton for NPRSharon Belvin’s nightmare with cancer began in 2004, when she was just 22.
Belvin was an avid runner but said she suddenly found she couldn’t climb the stairs without “a lot of difficulty breathing.”
Eventually, after months of fruitless treatments for lung ailments like bronchitis, she was diagnosed with melanoma — a very serious skin cancer. It had already spread to her lungs, and the prognosis was grim. She had about a 50-50 chance of surviving the next six months.

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A cancer diagnosis can be devastating to the way a family
is able to function normally on a day to day basis.
 

The average time for chemotherapy treatment is 4-6 months.  Some treatments can last a year.  This may start after a surgical procedure that requires recovery time prior to the start of chemotherapy.

If the diagnosed patient is a single income earner, or one half of a duel income family, the economic effect is significant.  When a child or teen is diagnosed, the same issue arises when one parent needs to be with the patient throughout the treatment.  Taking that parent out of the day to day schedule has emotional effects on other minor children within the home.  Who will take the other children to after school activities?  Who will make dinners, go to the grocery, maintain the secure home atmosphere for the children not diagnosed?  How can Dad earn the necessary income and maintain the home?

Deductibles for insurance are due at the start of treatment.  Most are significant for those trying to keep the monthly premiums low.  The average cost is $1,318 out of pocket before insurance begins to cover part of the bills.  Each doctor visit requires a copay.  The average copay for a specialist doctor visit is $30-$50.  Procedures needed for appropriate diagnosis that include an MRI, X-rays, radiation may not be fully covered.  The estimated cost of initial chemotherapy is $7,000.  More than one round of chemotherapy may be necessary.  This is the reality of a cancer diagnosis.

Financial support is available for patients and families that qualify during active treatment.  This is in addition to emotional, educational, patient advocacy, and spiritual support. The type of support can be specified by the patient, parent, or immediate family affected.

Hope Abounds offers educational programs to help guide the patient diagnosed to be the best advocate for themselves.  When accepted into our program the patient is offered a personal patient advocate, to help encourage and identify what will be the most effective way for Hope Abounds to make a difference.  We understand the overwhelming feeling that comes with a diagnosis.  We are here to offer HOPE!  

Hope Abounds, Inc.
A 501(c)(3) charitable organization.
Charity Number 27-1858542

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